Last Wednesday Open Mic, Dublin, 25 April 2012.


Quiet last Wednesday, with heavy rain and winds and storm outside and with Shakespearian storms predicted. A naughty night to swim in. But many stalwarts nonetheless braved the elements for their art!

Declan opened proceedings, calling for silence and ending of conversations and also being careful to ensure he insulted everyone in the room, as much as possible, and even one or two of those who weren’t around.

First up to the mic was Oran Ryan with some experimental work – perhaps the opening salvo of a joint work in progress – between Oran and John W Sexton – with Steve the tumour and Canal Bridges, a prose poem opening for a novel. Declan’s pertinent question – how does someone write a novel with another person? Which Oran replied – we’ll just have to figure that out! We shall expect a detailed report! After Oran it was the turn of Roger Hudson making a return after a long absence. He opened with ‘Silent Family’, with clacking of needles – and knitting and reading killing conversations. He followed this with ‘Propaganda’, ‘First Week of the Rest of my Life’ about first week at university; then an excerpt based on his historical detective novel, ending with ‘Arctic Circle Warnings’. After Roger it was the turn of our newly antipodean-ised Ross Hattaway, pretending to be jetlagged, reading from a sneak preview version of his soon to be launched Pretending to be Dead starting with the Tanka from the book, including ‘Black and Tanka’ and ‘Getting Lost in the Id Tanka’ and ‘Disrespecting the Prevailing Poetic Oligarchy Tanka’, and, like Declan before him, trying to ensure any insults were shared equally among those present – one for everybody in the . . . He then moved to the longer bits – with ‘Did You’, ‘The New Cooking’ – inspired by a tsunami of gastro-porn! Ross’ gift was from Bill Manhire – ‘Children’.

After Ross, there was a short break and after the break it was the turn of Eamonn Lynskey, reading ‘Early Christian Chronicle’, – not exactly sacrificed to lions but . . . and all the prayers, and cardinal red turning to black on the b&w TV. He followed with ‘At the Railway Crossing at Proterstown, Clonsilla’ and ‘Concerning the Concept of the Universe as an Accident Waiting to Happen’. He finished with ‘The Canals of Mars’, and possibilities if we could have stood outside our history – if only. After Eamonn, it was the turn of Stephen Pepper making his first Wednesday and open mic debut, playing with sounds and words, wondering if we know what we think we knew was true. After Stephen it was the turn of Anne Tannamwith some new poems – ‘Ferral’ about people lost to addiction; ‘Staunch’, about experience donating blood; ‘Rise’, which will becoming out in the Poetry Bus 4; ‘Seven Signs of Love’, ‘Parallel Universe’ and finishing up with a poem from her book Take this Life – ‘The Start of the Affair’ . After Anne it was the turn of Phil Lynch who Declan relaxed before his reading by reminding him how important it was to give a good finish! Phil opened with an anti-homage to Dick Spring and John Bruton, chased his shadow, and then read ‘Mirage’ about that elusive poem and in memory of Louis Le Brocquy who died today. He next read a sonnet ‘Encounters’, and ended with a recent poem, ‘Questions’ inspired by and dedicated to his 18 month old granddaughter.

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LAST WEDNESDAY OPEN MIC 28th March 2012


On an evening when the unseasonably hot sun wet to follow Ross across southern skies, leaving us to freeze and the guys playing the gig upstairs thought it was appropriate to go on their smoke breaks in their underwear (no we don’t know either, but suddenly the pyjama girls are starting to look reasonable, Declan our venerable MC was unable to be present at this open mic, so was once again replaced with a hat, but a different hat – the first one having met a tragic end involving a broken hat hook and puppies! Steve Conway acknowledges the hat MC dynasty as the Hatsburg Dynasty!

Steve Conway first up to the mic and in Ross Hattaway’s absence he opened with a pun (being pulled early!) and then did his own take on the gift, opening with Robert Frost’s, ‘Stopping in a winter woods’ and followed this up with an updated, tech-ed up version of this – with miles to go before he tweets, miles to go before he tweets! Next out of the hat was Jona Xhepa making her last Wednesday debut reading three poems, involving BBC Radio, Desert Island discs as well as ‘City of Fools’ and ‘Hangman’s Discount’ about quite literally a hangman’s discount, one now and the second one half price. Next up was Oran Ryan, reading from Grenfell was a Loser, his current work in progress, about that awful boss we have all had! And all the things we really want to tell them! Next it was the turn of Noel O Briain who decided, picking up somewhat on the opening theme of Steve Conway, communication, and the changes in communication since the advances in communication possibilities, starting on a phone in a Peugeot 404 and an answering machine that is a Panasonic liar; and following with ‘Communication’, a possible breakdown through communication (?) and then ending up with a letter written to the Pope – not having his mobile number to talk to him, or his email address, the letter written following seeing the Pope and a gross (Noel’s invention – amount equalling about a dozen, or fat and overfed!) of Cardinals in all their glory trooping into a meeting about child sexual abuse.

Following a short break it was time for David Murphy to escape from the hat, reading from his recently published Bird of Prey modern fantasy novel centred around Walter Walter (Walts) and a crystal bird, lot 28. After David, Michael Bossonet climbed out of the hat, and by strange coincidence, as David ended with an eagle soaring, he started with another (the same?) eagle soaring! His second poem also involved flapping in breeze, this time paper, a note perhaps, potential magic, full of potential? He ended with ‘Hope is the Howler’, with a monkey named Max, incandescent beings, and Dover, and transience. After Michael it was the turn of Liam Parsons making his Last Wednesday debut, performing ‘My Impressions of Killian O’Hara’ – not a real person, of course (!) and maybe a bee – though not quite causing a buzz! He ended with a gift in memory of his dog who died recently – Byron’s poem for his dog! Next up was Patrick Chapman reading from his recent collection The Darwin Vampires including the title poem which was nominated for the Pushcart award. He also read ‘Skywalker Country’ from a childhood memory; and ‘St Dracula’ from another memory, and the BBC (lots of sub themes!). He also read his global warming poem – ‘4 Degrees’, sending a chill around the room, ‘The Forest’ (definite sub-themes here!) and ended with a childhood dream ‘Gloria Mundi’.

After a short break it was Helen Dempsey’s turn to escape from the MC hat. Helen read ‘Thesaurus’, and some poems on a theme (has a monster been created?) – a seasonal theme – the week of the full moon, with its promises of longer days, ‘Easter’ and ‘The Garden Gate’ – an aspect of banking, a different view, perhaps, but with a sort of Easter theme also, though maybe without the benefit of a resurrection. After Helen, it was Liz McSkeane’s turn to be de-hatted, reading ‘Sculpture, Botanic Gardens’, continuing with the Spring theme; ‘incidents on Princengraft’, from a trip to Amsterdam and ending with ‘Compulsion to Repeat’, with shifts in view, twist in plot, perhaps and then back to do the whole damn thing again. After Liz, it was Desmond Swords out of the hat and up to the mic, making a return to Last Wednesday after a long absence, performing some of his work, with flying and birds again, but this time, a flock of poets, or part of a flock anyway. He’s finished with a continuation of the communication technology theme – reading ‘Merrion Square’ from his phone! After Desmond, Eamonn Lynskey was snatched from the hat and plonked in front of the mic, starting with a poem he wrote accidentally – about botched beheadings and Anne Boleyn’s decision to pay for a professional to be in charge in her case. Also, in honour of the weather, he delved into And Suddenly the Sun Again, opening up that long running debate – ‘Is it possible to be dignified on a bike in the rain’; and then an ode to those talking to themselves on public thoroughfares with [check poem] and ending with a poem about the people he hates ‘How Often Spirit have I Turned to Thee’, don’t mince words, Eamonn, what do you really mean? Next to be de-hatted was Bob Shakeshaft starting off with ‘Still’ about a charcoal drawing he has, ‘Nicotine Devil’, in honour (sort of) smokers; and the ‘Butterfly’, about, well, a butterfly! And with his gift poem was Yvenni Yvteshenko. After Bob the hat gave up its last hostage and Sandra Harris took to the night, telling us her recent wins – 3rd in The Big Issue 2012 competition, one of 20 shortlisted for Cork short story competition and shortlisted for the Strokestown International Poetry Competition. And then reading a new story, not yet short listed – about a fix for a broken gaydar, followed by her shortlisted poem ‘Tubbers and Me’ about a bizarre (no kidding!) dream about Ryan Tubridy. Who’d have thought Tubbers would be a muse!

And remember many of the people listed above have been published in our anthology of the reading events Census 3 The Seven Towers Anthology.

LAST WEDNESDAY OPEN MIC 29th FEB 2012


Opening the open mic Declan confessed to being a stalker – playing games with faces and a face that then turned
up at the open mic!

After the confession, Declan moved on to threats saying he would walk at people (as opposed to behind and stalking) if they went over time!

First up was Jim Rooney; back after an absence, opening with a ‘Molly’ poem (Molly being his character, the octogenarian prostitute); his
second poem was called ‘Therapy’ – an open mic dream, no nightmare with listeners drowning in possible politeness and the appearance of
an opportunistic great white shark!

After Jim it was the turn of Oran Ryan; who also told of a flooding dream – within which a poem wrote itself. Oran read from Census 3 –
‘portrait of an atheist monk at prayer’ and ‘revised portable edition Prudence Antipode’.

After Oran it was the turn of Michael Philippe Bossinet, making his debut at the Last Wednesday Series. Michael’s first poem was ‘Fallen
Angel’, followed by ‘Hope is the Howler’; a mystery poem/cypher; then ‘Slash Star’ – being with the band; and ending with ‘Sleep’ about,
well; sleep!

After Michael it was Noel O Briain at the mic – starting with two short poems – about the recent finding of bodies in the Dublin mountains; he finished with a revisit to an old poem from a themed night about Joyce, about Marylin Monroe reading Ulysses – this year being the 50th anniversary of Marylin’s death – and a year to celebrate the escape from copyright of Joyce’s work:

after a short break it was the turn of Steve Conway reading from his current work in progress, Running Away from the Circus, Everything I know about Radio I Learned by Screwing it Up, about the job that
almost was.

After Steve, Eamonn Lynskey came to the mic, reading about a traffic jam ‘At the Railway Crossing . . .town, Clonsilla’, followed by a poem i.m Vaclav Havel – read appropriately on the night of the Ireland
Czech match! His third poem was an edited version of ‘The Coming Back’, ‘Springtime at the Zoo’ (which will be in Riposte) – it being Spring – at the Zoo? Maybe. And he finished with a gift – Thomas
Kinsella’s Mirror in February.

After Eamonn it was the turn of Bob Shakeshaft reading a trilogy about the infamous Dr Neary, from three different points of view. Bob’s gift was from Anna Akmatova. After Bob it was the turn of Helen
Dempsey back new and improved after an absence, reading ‘Millennium Spring’ apt again with the virus affecting sheep and lambs at the moment; Helen’s next three poems were love poems -acknowledging the
February month – and the leap year day – ‘Love Poem’, ‘Spied Assignation’ and, from Census 3, Valentine’s Day 2010.

After a short break it was the turn of Pat Boyle and John Clarke with their combination music and poetry, starting off with ‘Must be Us’, a love poem (keeping with Helen Dempsey’s theme); followed by Le Pigeon
de Jardin Albert Premier (I think!); their next piece was also set in France, this time in a Parisian cafe. they ended with Nice anticipation about going to the South of France.

After John and Pat it was Ross Hattaway to the mic again returning after a brief absence. starting with ‘Birth of a Nation Tanka’; ‘Executive Summary Tanka’, then ‘Aisling’, ‘Did You?’ (a good civil service poem!), ‘The Need for Leadership’. He ended with a gift, ‘from the Funeral of Allie Flynt’ in honour of a recently deceased friend, Shane.

After Ross it was Delta O’Hara at the mic, sharing her Mickey Dolenz meeting story – in memory of recently deceased Davy Jones from the Monkees, before a short performance on ‘phone sex stuff’!

After Delta it was the turn of Evan Buckley making his Last Wednesday debut, reading poems including ‘Vultures’, ‘The Misused Umbrella’, ‘Fire and Stone’, ‘Her Wooden Bowl’, and ending with a poem from when
he lived abroad and wondered about life in Ireland ‘Perhaps in my
Absence’

Sean Dennehy also making his last Wednesday debut performing ‘Moments, minds and years’ and ‘No Poetry’. After Sean it was the turn of Liz McSkeane (of the Dublin Writers’ Forum) reading some recently
workshopped poems – ‘On the Old Road to Cork’, ‘Storm’, ‘Lott’s Wife’, ‘Caught’ and ending with ‘Into the Blue’, reading her carefully chosen words with her beautiful soft accent. After Liz it was the turn of
Sean Ruane reading about a powercut in Meath just after his father died, followed by ‘Lent’, (with an aside about a particular real life rendition of the Oscar Wilde line – gutter and stars where Dunsink
used to have a dump and an observatory; followed by ‘Tipping Point’ about some peoples tendencies to dump their rubbish in other peoples areas! Then ‘Phantom’; and ending with a work in progress about
revolving doors – called ‘Revolving Doors’. And then we were done! Till next month.

Ross with humor and seriousness in equal measure and a dollop of challenge!

FIRST WEDNESDAY 7 TOWERS LUNCHTIME READING WEDNESDAY 2ND MAY 2012 LOFT BOOKSHOP


Listen to POETS AND WRITERS read from their work in the LOFT BOOKSHOP Twisted Pepper Middle Abbey street – – LUNCH AVAILABLE

1.15 pm – 1.45 pm WEDNESDAY 2ND MAY 2012

RAVEN WITH SPECIAL GUESTS: KIMBERLY CAMPANELLO, CLIFF HORSEMAN & ERIN FORNOFF

ERIN FORNOFF

Erin hails from Asheville in the Appalachian mountains of North Carolina and currently lives in a cabin in the wilds of Wicklow. After writing a bit of poetry in high school and a single poem in college she decided she liked performing more than pages and moved into spoken word. For fun she memorizes poems–hers and others–on her commute. She has performed her poetry at The Glor Sessions, Brownbread Mixtape, Speakeasy Cabaret in Greystones, and Kilmainham Arts Night in Dublin.



CAH 44 – CLIFF HORSEMAN

CAH-44 (A.K.A. Clifford A. Horseman) is a North American poet living in Dublin with particular interests in performance, contextual performance, internal and urban image-scapes, sound, and both multi-media and musical collaboration. Performing extensively in the US and Europe, he has appeared in a wide variety of venues including: SXSW in Austin, Texas; Insomnia Performance Lockdown in Atlanta, Georgia; Exchange Words at The Exchange, Dublin; Electric Picnic, Co. Laois; and theFlat Lake Literary and Arts Festival, Co. Monaghan. While primarily interested in performance, his work has also appeared in print in such places as: The Rocky Mountain Review, ACE Magazine, AMP, Rain City Review, and the UpStart Poster Project.

CAH-44 curates and co-hosts Tongue Box, Dublin’s longest running performance poetry showcase. His chapbook, still beat/ still beat, is published by Wurm Press.

Kimberly Campanello’s chapbook Spinning Cities was published by Wurm Press in 2010. She was selected to read in the Poetry

Ireland Introductions Series in 2011 and was featured poet in the Summer 2010 issue of The Stinging Fly. Her work has also appeared in The Irish Left Review, Eyewear, nthposition, The Cream City Review, Italian Americana, and GulfStream, among other magazines. In 2009, she was a resident at the Fundación Valparaíso in Mojácar, Spain. Kimberly is an assistant editor of Rowboat, a new magazine dedicated to poetry in translation. She earned an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Alabama and an MA in Gender Studies from the University of Cincinnati. She is completing a PhD in Creative Writing at Middlesex University, London. Kimberly has taught literature and Creative Writing at the University of Alabama, Florida Gulf Coast University, and the National University of Ireland, Maynooth, and she is currently teaching poetry writing at the Big Smoke Writing Factory in Dublin.

Raven is a poet, activist and performance artist from San Francisco,

California.

“Born in San Francisco, 1965. Raised on the edge of America, within earshot of the ocean, in a house full of books, music and politics. My folks – longshoreman, lab technician – were also professional musicians, Socialists, activists for labor and social justice.

Wasn’t much interested in applying myself at school – a litany of alleged facts that both bored and intimidated me – but read voraciously on my own time, questioned everything and, while I had friends, inhabited a private world revolving not on any grand scheme but on the tiniest details.

Studied film, graphic design and painting in college, was called away from studies by the responsibilities of young parenthood — and an uncontrollable fear of institutions. Worked intermittently as a graphic designer, cinematographer, and at whatever jobs I had to in order to make a living. In the gaps, joined the next generation of activists, applying my skills as an artist – including writing — to creative protest, guerilla theatre.

I’d been writing poetry since a child – a means of translating the world, distilling chaos to essences I could digest. Found inspiration in the Beats, the radical black poets of the 60’s and 70’s, hip hop. In the early 90’s, started reading publicly at open mics and getting published in local anthologies, small-press magazines.

Moved to Ireland in 2005, and moved from reading to performing, getting the opportunity to support Saul Williams twice during his 2006 tour, perform yearly at the Electric Picnic, as well as in Wales and England. I have been published in two anthologies in Ireland, won Balcony TV’s Best Alternative Performer award in 2008, and currently run and perform at the monthly spoken word showcase Tongue Box, in Dublin. Seven Towers will be publishing Ravens collection in 2013.

Seven Towers Last wednesday Open Mic 25th April 2012 downstairs in the box Twisted pepper middle abbey st 7.30 pm


Friends

A quick reminder of the Seven Towers Last Wednesday Open Mic on the 25th APRIL 2012, downstairs in the ‘box’ at the Twisted pepper Middle Abbey St D. 1

At 7.30 pm.

As always feel welcome, Come one, come all ! For more info go Here and Go Here .

Newcomers ARE always welcome. TEA AND REFRESHMENTS AND A BAR AVAILABLE (Please drink Sensibly)

Seven Towers

**NEW YORK LAUNCH OF CENSUS 3 – ** – INVITATION TO LAST WEDNESDAY OPEN MIC AND LAUNCH OF ANTHOLOGY


Seven Towers and Rocky Sullivan’s

are delighted to announce the New York launch of our International anthology

Census 3,

Seven Towers loves great literature

in Rocky Sullivan’s, Red Hook, Brooklyn, New York on 25th April at 7pm.

Census 3 will be launched by Scottish Born, Dublin based poet and short story writer Liz McSkeane.

As the name suggests Census 3 census of those on the literary scene around the world at this time and it is drawn from the work of writers who have read at our events around the world, including at out monthly event The Last Wednesday Series Reading and Open Mic which runs on t he last Wednesday of each month in The Twisted Pepper, Abbey Street, Dublin and Rocky Sullivan’s, Red Hook, Brooklyn New York.

Writers in Census 3 include New York based poet Quincy R Lehr, whose second poetry collection Obscure Classics of English Progressive Rock (Seven Towers 2012) will be launched in May; New Jersey native Rick Mullin, whose book length poem Hunckewas published by Seven Towers in 2010; Queens native novelist John Liam Shea, whose novel Cut and Run in the Bronx will be published by Seven Towers in November; New York based poet and classicist Doog Wood, whose collection Old Men Forget was published by Seven Towers in 2009; Texas based New Yorker, Mike Alexander whose collection The Necessary Slice will be published by Seven Towers later this year; NYC Creative Writing Masters Program graduate Matthew Aquilone; New Jersey native Billy Barrett; Long Island poet, Robert Donohue; Arsenic Lobster editor Lissa Kiernan; much published author and runner up for the William Stafford Award for Poetry, Richard Levine; Lavender Review editor Mary Meriam; New York poet and local politician Frank Perero; the late Brooklyn based poet and novelist, Ray Pospisil, whose collection The Bell is available here ; Brooklyn based artist and writer, Oriane Stender.

Liz McSkeane was born in Glasgow and has lived in Dublin since 1981 where she has worked as a teacher, broadcaster and education consultant with a special interest in literacy and educational disadvantage. In 1988 she joined Dublin Writers’ Workshop which she co-facilitated for two years with the writer John Minihane; in 1990 they founded the DWW journal, Acorn, named for the Oak Tavern in Dame Street, the original venue where the Workshop used to meet. Since then, Liz has written numerous poems, short stories and radio scripts, many of which have been published in newspapers, magazines and literary journals including The Irish Times , Poetry Ireland Review , The Shop, The Stinging Fly and others. Her work has been broadcast on RTE Radio , on several programmes including The Arts Show and The Enchanted Road. She also scripted and presented three literary documentaries for RTE Radio 1 on the lives and work of Beckett, Robert Burns and George Bernard Shaw . In 1996, Lapwing Press published her first short poetry collection, a chapbook called In Flight. Her poetry has also been anthologized in The White Page (Salmon Poetry, 1999) and Slow Time: 100 Poems to Take You There (Mercier, 2000). In 1999 Liz won the Sunday Tribune New Irish Writer of the Year Award and the Emerging Poetry Award. Her first full collection, Snow at the Opera House, was published in 2002 by New Island Press. Since then, alongside working on her poems and short stories, Liz has completed her PhD in Education. Most of her publications in the last few years have been in that field, on behalf of various Irish and European organizations including, in the last two years, the European Commission. She is currently working on her next collection of poems, provisionally entitled Versailles; and also on her first novel. In 2011 Liz started the Dublin Writers’ Workshop which she now runs with fellow poet Anne Tannam.

Seven Towers is a not-for-profit Literary Activist Press committed to publishing great literature at reasonable prices and to keeping the literary scene active and alive. The press is run completely by volunteers, including Lisa McLaughlin who runs and MCs the Last Wednesday Series in Rocky Sullivan’s. We would like to thank Lisa for her ongoing enthusiasm and Rocky Sullivan’s too for the use of that great space.

Census 3 (ISBN 9780957151017) is available in hard copy for $15 and as an extended version ebook (ISBN 978-0-9562033-2-8).for $6.60 HERE

It will be available to purchase at the launch, and can also be purchased from www.seventowers.ie. Website purchase is post free to anywhere and all purchases of the book in hard copy from the website get the ebook absolutely free!

A full list of contributors to Census 3 is available here, and further details including the Irish launch are available here.

LAST WEDNESDAY OPEN MIC 28TH MARCH 2012


On an evening when the unseasonably hot sun wet to follow Ross across southern skies, leaving us to freeze and the guys playing the gig upstairs thought it was appropriate to go on their smoke breaks in their underwear (no we don’t know either, but suddenly the pyjama girls are starting to look reasonable, Declan our venerable MC was unable to be present at this open mic, so was once again replaced with a hat, but a different hat – the first one having met a tragic end involving a broken hat hook and puppies! Steve Conway acknowledges the hat MC dynasty as the Hatsburg Dynasty!

Steve Conway first up to the mic and in Ross Hattaway’s absence he opened with a pun (being pulled early!) and then did his own take on the gift, opening with Robert Frost’s, ‘Stopping in a winter woods’ and followed this up with an updated, tech-ed up version of this – with miles to go before he tweets, miles to go before he tweets! Next out of the hat was Jona Xhepa making her last Wednesday debut reading three poems, involving BBC Radio, Desert Island discs as well as ‘City of Fools’ and ‘Hangman’s Discount’ about quite literally a hangman’s discount, one now and the second one half price. Next up was Oran Ryan, reading from Grenfell was a Loser, his current work in progress, about that awful boss we have all had! And all the things we really want to tell them! Next it was the turn of Noel O Briain who decided, picking up somewhat on the opening theme of Steve Conway, communication, and the changes in communication since the advances in communication possibilities, starting on a phone in a Peugeot 404 and an answering machine that is a Panasonic liar; and following with ‘Communication’, a possible breakdown through communication (?) and then ending up with a letter written to the Pope – not having his mobile number to talk to him, or his email address, the letter written following seeing the Pope and a gross (Noel’s invention – amount equalling about a dozen, or fat and overfed!) of Cardinals in all their glory trooping into a meeting about child sexual abuse.

Following a short break it was time for David Murphy to escape from the hat, reading from his recently published Bird of Prey modern fantasy novel centred around Walter Walter (Walts) and a crystal bird, lot 28. After David, Michael Bossonet climbed out of the hat, and by strange coincidence, as David ended with an eagle soaring, he started with another (the same?) eagle soaring! His second poem also involved flapping in breeze, this time paper, a note perhaps, potential magic, full of potential? He ended with ‘Hope is the Howler’, with a monkey named Max, incandescent beings, and Dover, and transience. After Michael it was the turn of Liam Parsons making his Last Wednesday debut, performing ‘My Impressions of Killian O’Hara’ – not a real person, of course (!) and maybe a bee – though not quite causing a buzz! He ended with a gift in memory of his dog who died recently – Byron’s poem for his dog! Next up was Patrick Chapman reading from his recent collection The Darwin Vampires including the title poem which was nominated for the Pushcart award. He also read ‘Skywalker Country’ from a childhood memory; and ‘St Dracula’ from another memory, and the BBC (lots of sub themes!). He also read his global warming poem – ‘4 Degrees’, sending a chill around the room, ‘The Forest’ (definite sub-themes here!) and ended with a childhood dream ‘Gloria Mundi’.

After a short break it was Helen Dempsey’s turn to escape from the MC hat. Helen read ‘Thesaurus’, and some poems on a theme (has a monster been created?) – a seasonal theme – the week of the full moon, with its promises of longer days, ‘Easter’ and ‘The Garden Gate’ – an aspect of banking, a different view, perhaps, but with a sort of Easter theme also, though maybe without the benefit of a resurrection. After Helen, it was Liz McSkeane’s turn to be de-hatted, reading ‘Sculpture, Botanic Gardens’, continuing with the Spring theme; ‘incidents on Princengraft’, from a trip to Amsterdam and ending with ‘Compulsion to Repeat’, with shifts in view, twist in plot, perhaps and then back to do the whole damn thing again. After Liz, it was Desmond Swords out of the hat and up to the mic, making a return to Last Wednesday after a long absence, performing some of his work, with flying and birds again, but this time, a flock of poets, or part of a flock anyway. He’s finished with a continuation of the communication technology theme – reading ‘Merrion Square’ from his phone! After Desmond, Eamonn Lynskey was snatched from the hat and plonked in front of the mic, starting with a poem he wrote accidentally – about botched beheadings and Anne Boleyn’s decision to pay for a professional to be in charge in her case. Also, in honour of the weather, he delved into And Suddenly the Sun Again, opening up that long running debate – ‘Is it possible to be dignified on a bike in the rain’; and then an ode to those talking to themselves on public thoroughfares with [check poem] and ending with a poem about the people he hates ‘How Often Spirit have I Turned to Thee’, don’t mince words, Eamonn, what do you really mean? Next to be de-hatted was Bob Shakeshaft starting off with ‘Still’ about a charcoal drawing he has, ‘Nicotine Devil’, in honour (sort of) smokers; and the ‘Butterfly’, about, well, a butterfly! And with his gift poem was Yvenni Yvteshenko. After Bob the hat gave up its last hostage and Sandra Harris took to the night, telling us her recent wins – 3rd in The Big Issue 2012 competition, one of 20 shortlisted for Cork short story competition and shortlisted for the Strokestown International Poetry Competition. And then reading a new story, not yet short listed – about a fix for a broken gaydar, followed by her shortlisted poem ‘Tubbers and Me’ about a bizarre (no kidding!) dream about Ryan Tubridy. Who’d have thought Tubbers would be a muse!

And remember many of the people listed above have been published in our anthology of the reading events Census 3 The Seven Towers Anthology.

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